(Course Effective Date: January 9, 2020)

Course Description: According to the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health, trauma can have significant mental health consequences. Yet the agencies and systems to which survivors and their children turn are frequently unprepared to address the range of issues they face in trying to access safety and heal from the traumatic effects of abuse. 

After this training, participants will be able to: 

  • Understand how child abuse, neglect, and other trauma may affect children’s primary relationships and ongoing development;

  • Explore opportunities and challenges in promoting safety, healing, and strengthening parenting capacity with families involved in the child welfare system;

  • Examine the impact on you, your own trauma exposure responses, and how to transform the effects; and

  • Sustain trauma-informed, compassionate mediation environments in Nevada.

This course is designed for dependency mediators, children’s attorneys representing children in 432B cases, child welfare caseworkers and supervisors, district attorneys, public defenders, and parents’ attorneys.

Faculty: Susan Blumenfeld, MSW, LCSW and Melissa Mangiaracina, JD

Continuing Education Credit: 2.5 DV CLE (Certificate of Completion required to receive continuing legal/judicial education credit.) NOTE: CLE credit for this course is approved through December 31, 2023 and then will be stale dated.

(Course Effective Date: January 9, 2020)

Course Description:

Domestic violence is one of the strongest predictors of child abuse and neglect fatalities in the United States.  Forty percent of child abuse victims report domestic violence in the home.  We know that 70% of domestic violence go unreported.

The U.S. Children’s Bureau says that one of the barriers to successful outcomes for children who come to the attention of the court in child welfare cases is a lack of trained and effective representatives; someone to advocate for timeliness in agency and court handling of the child’s case. National Consensus is that a child deserves a vigorous and active attorney.

In this virtual training, you will learn:

  • What domestic violence is and how it impacts victims and children;

  • That domestic violence involves power and control, rather than mental illness or anger;

  • The factors associated with battering behavior;

  • Why victims stay, recant, or lie;

  • The impact of removal on children;

  • How to overcome your own bias;

  • How to screen for domestic violence in dependency cases; and

  • Planning for a Safe Mediation

This course is designed for dependency mediators, children’s attorneys representing children in 432B cases, child welfare caseworkers and supervisors, district attorneys, public defenders, and parents’ attorneys.

Faculty: Karen Zavora and Melissa Mangiaracina, Sierra Mediation, LLC

Continuing Education Credit: 2.0 CLE DV (Certificate of Completion required to receive continuing legal/judicial education credit.) NOTE: CLE credit for this course is approved through December 31, 2023 and then will be stale dated.

Recorded September 5, 2019

Course Description: Data on child welfare case processing and outcomes are not always easy to come by. At the state level, the child welfare agency must report specific data point to the federal government. These data are made available to the public, however, they are limited in scope and only include the largest jurisdictions in the state. Chapin Hall, through their Foster Care Data Archive, works with states to compile their child welfare data in a meaningful way. These data are often more current than the publicly available data and can be examined by each judicial district in the state providing child welfare and legal professionals an opportunity to track their data over time. (These data have been updated since this recording.) This training will introduce professionals to the Foster Care Data Archive website and walk people through the basic steps for exploring their own data in a meaningful way. Opportunities will be provided for participants to ask questions and explore the availability of data elements they are interested in. For maximum learning, participants should be able to connect via computer and audio (either computer or phone) to view the demonstration. 

Who Should Attend: This course is designed for Nevada child welfare, dependency judiciary and their Community Improvement Council Members. 

Faculty: Alicia Summers, Ph.D., Data Savvy Consulting 

Education Credit: 1.5 CLE/CJE for judges/attorneys (Certificate of Completion required to receive continuing legal/judicial education credit.) NOTE: CLE credit for this course is approved through December 31, 2022 and then will be stale dated.


(Recorded February 9, 2018)

Course Description: The statewide Juvenile Dependency Mediation Program (JDMP) was launched in July 2016. The purpose of the Program is to improve system processing of dependency cases; thereby decreasing time to permanency and termination of parental rights (TPR). In so doing, it helps stabilize children’s lives by getting them into safe, secure, and permanent homes in a timely manner consistent with the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997. This course provides an overview of the Juvenile Dependency Mediation Program, its purposes and processes and basic tips and strategies to ensure successful participation in juvenile dependency mediations.

This course is designed for dependency court judiciary and stakeholders.

Faculty: Margaret Crowley, Esq., Crowley Mediation and Director, Juvenile Dependency Mediation Program

Continuing Education Credit: 1.5 CLE (Certificate of Completion required to receive continuing legal/judicial education credit.) NOTE: CLE credit for this course is approved through December 31, 2021 and then will be stale dated.

(Course Effective Date: January 9, 2020)

Course Description:

The U.S. Children’s Bureau says that one of the barriers to successful outcomes for children who come to the attention of the court in child welfare cases is a lack of trained and effective representatives; someone to advocate for timeliness in agency and court handling of the child’s case. National Consensus is that a child deserves a vigorous and active attorney.

In this virtual roundtable, you will learn:

  • What the role of the children’s attorney is in each dependency hearings and how to prepare;

  • Crucial child placement information;

  • The fundamentals of representing children;

  • The outcomes for the child;

  • How to detect issues and pitfalls and how to manage them

This course is designed for Children’s attorneys representing children in 432B cases, child welfare caseworkers and supervisors, district attorneys, public defenders, and parents’ attorneys.

Faculty: 
Judge Frank P. Sullivan, Eighth Judicial District Court
Janice Wolf, Esq., Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada
Kim Abbott, Esq., Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada
Tirzah F. Mathews, Esq., Nevada Attorney General's Office
Massey Mayo, Esq., Dolan Law, LLC

Welcome and Introduction by Katherine Malzahn-Bass, Court Improvement Program Coordinator

Continuing Education Credit: 6.0 CLE (includes 1.0 Ethics credit) upon completion of Modules 1-10. (Certificate of Completion required to receive continuing legal/judicial education credit.) NOTE: CLE credit for this course is approved through December 31, 2023 and then will be stale dated.


(Recorded July 25, 2017)

Course Description: The Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) was passed in 1978 after two years of Congressional hearings determined that Native children were being removed from their families and communities at disproportionately high rates. Since passage, courts around the country have struggled to understand the intent of the law and inconsistent implementation has left many individuals and families feeling frustrated and unable to trust the system. Many workers assigned to ICWA cases have felt similar frustration as terms like “active efforts” and “good cause” have not been adequately defined. In December 2016, federal regulations went into effect adding new requirements for judges. These are the first legally-binding changes since the law was passed. 

This training will cover some of the reasons why this law was passed and why it remains important 39 years later. The first module will provide context and personal accounts of why Congress determined that ICWA was needed and shed light on the intent of the law. The second module will go into both statutory and regulatory language, highlighting new definitions and new findings judges must make on the record in order to be in compliance with the federal regulations. The third module will include case scenarios that will help resolve some of the ambiguities and confusions around the legal requirements.

This course is designed for dependency court judiciary and stakeholders.

Faculty: Victoria Sweet, JD, Program Attorney, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges

Continuing Education Credit: 2.0 CLE upon completion of Introduction and Modules 1-3. (Certificate of Completion required to receive continuing legal/judicial education credit.) NOTE: CLE credit for this course is approved through December 31, 2020 and then will be stale dated.